Rebranding In Five Questions

By September 15, 2017Branding

When you know it’s time for a rebranding move.

Rebranding happens constantly and does not only concern the company’s look and feel, but encompasses value 
proposition and core belief as well. Most of the time, as consumers, we don’t notice the change, unless it’s 
a serious makeover. It’s like having a new hair cut: everybody notices something’s different about your look, 
but because it suits you naturally, can’t really pin what has exactly changed.
Other times, rebranding represents a more substantial effort than, say, changing a logo or corporate font, 
perhaps aiming to shift the consumers’ perception or to show a company’s progression with an evolving market. 
Here are five questions you need to ask yourself before embarking on this journey.

Will a rebrand compromise your brand equity?

Having a well-known brand name and reputation is valuable, and the founders’ loyalty and nostalgia are not the
only drivers that keep things together when it’s time to change.
In that case, when you decide to rebrand, you have to make sure that customers will still be able to  associate
your visual brand with your reliable reputation.

With a recent logo revamp, International House of Pancakes maintained their easily recognizable color combination,
shapes and fonts, but put a positive twist.


Has your target demographic changed since you created your brand?

If your company no longer attracts the customers you’re aiming for or you want to tap into a new demographic,
rebranding can help. One recent example is MTV: although technically, the company always aimed to reach younger
viewers, teens of today are not the same as when MTV just started. By going from slogan ‘I want my MTV’ to 
‘I am my MTV’, the brand opens up, focusing on today’s teens’ desires to express their individuality, and adds
a social media dimension. 



Does your brand tell a story?

If your company no longer attracts the customers you’re aiming for or you want to tap into a new demographic,
rebranding can help. One recent example is MTV: although technically, the company always aimed to reach younger
viewers, teens of today are not the same as when MTV just started. By going from slogan ‘I want my MTV’ to 
‘I am my MTV’, the brand opens up, focusing on today’s teens’ desires to express their individuality, and adds
a social media dimension. 


Does your brand create a memorable impression?

As a business owner, you want customers to remember your brand, recommend it, and come back the next time
they need the services you provide. That’s quite a tough job if your brand doesn’t stand out. Take Duolingo’s 
example: in the world of language learning, while other competitors are stuffy and expensive, Duolingo’s 
offering is different. In addition, it completely revamped its visual identity. The updated color scheme and
cutter-than-ever owl logo convey the feeling of fun learning.


Are you entering a new market?

When a brand aims to succeed in China, from localized name to rebranding, there’s often an opportunity to 
reposition itself completely differently. For example, when fast-food chain Pizza Hut first opened in China,
it was almost unrecognizable to people from the U.S.—from the menu to contemporary interior, to tagline
‘a five-star dining experience at a three-star price’. In terms of naming, Pizza Hut also went the different
road in China: 必胜客(Bi Sheng Ke) gives no hint that the restaurant is about pizza, but the name resonates
well with the audience. 


A brand makeover is a precise endeavor best handled by the professionals, which can tell your customers that
your company is continuously adapting and providing new ways to meet their demands.


Pictures source: https://designtoimprovelife.dk/category/award2017/




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